Property Rights

People have a constitutionally protectable property interest in maintaining their driver’s license.  See Mackey v. Montrym (suspension of a driver’s license for statutorily defined cause implicates a protectable property interest).  Although motorists are not compelled to pay any assessments and surcharges, they are strongly motivated to do so.  This is due to the fact that both their driver’s license would be automatically suspended and their right to renew their motor vehicle registration would be denied for nonpayment.

People also clearly have a constitutionally protectable property interest in their money, subject only to lawful actions by the government that comport with due process.  Herrada v. City of Detroit (money is certainly a property interest) citing Hampton v. Hobbs (concluding that even prisoners have a property interest in their money).